The Art of Taking Action Intro

The Art of Taking Action

Lessons from Japanese Psychology

Drawing on Eastern philosophy, Buddhism, Morita therapy, Naikan and Kaizen, Gregg Krech offers an approach to ACTION that guides you to doing what is important for you to do in the time you have left.

Comments from readers

Morris Sekiyo Sullivan

Morris Sekiyo Sullivan

In “The Art of Taking Action,” Gregg Krech has not just pointed out the importance of action to our lives, but formulated a system for deciding what truly “should be done” and then overcoming the obstacles that get in the way of following through. Happily, Krech not only has a grasp on what it takes to get going and keep going, he also has a gift for making Japanese wisdom both accessible and interesting to read.

Ying Studebaker, former Director of Wellness and Health Coaching, Ohio State Univ. Health Plan.

Ying Studebaker, former Director of Wellness and Health Coaching, Ohio State Univ. Health Plan.

The Art of Taking Action is the best book on developing habit/building character that I have ever read. The book’s insight is superb, with numerous examples of road blocks that people face when they try to make changes. An excellent book -- introducing Eastern Psychology to the West in a very practical way.

Ron Hogen Green, Zen teacher, MRO

Ron Hogen Green, Zen teacher, MRO

This book is a door way into living a life of accomplishment and satisfaction that leaves no one out. A cookbook for life -- providing guidance and recipes that will nourish you and those around you. It addresses the kinds of challenges we all face in cooking our life, and is the best book of its kind that I’ve ever encountered.

Victoria Register-Freeman, author, Love Stories from the Bible

Victoria Register-Freeman, author, Love Stories from the Bible

In The Art of Taking Action, Gregg Krech has created a set of cables for jump starting projects of any size. And once the project is on the road, Krech uses wit and timeless spiritual wisdom to provide a map for the entire journey.

Susan Bourgerie, Loring Psychotherapy and Mindfulness Center

Susan Bourgerie, Loring Psychotherapy and Mindfulness Center

"The Art of Taking Action will help you do just that! If you're stuck in the muddle of your mind this gem of a book will help you find your way out."

Rev. William Masuda, Shin Buddhist Minister

Rev. William Masuda, Shin Buddhist Minister

The Art of Taking Action is a practical and inspiring book on cultivating an active, purposeful life. In the world of daily responsibilities to family, work and community, it’s a useful and guide to moving forward actively and gratefully and brings balance to contemplative practice.

Angela Winter, Singer-Writer

Angela Winter, Singer-Writer

The Art of Taking Action is a generous compendium of resources, ideas, and strategies for doing what matters most. This slim volume, filled with practical insights, wisdom, and humor, will get you moving, keep you going, and provide companionship along the way. Highly recommended!

About the author

Biography

Gregg Krech is one of the leading authorities on Japanese Psychology in North America and is the founding Director of the ToDo Institute, an educational center for purposeful living in Vermont.  He is the author of the award-winning book: Naikan: Gratitude, Grace & the Japanese Art of Self-Reflection (Stone Bridge Press, 2002), which has been translated into five languages, and the editor of Thirty Thousand Days: A Journal for Purposeful Living.
His work has been featured in a wide range of publications including a feature interview in THE SUN magazine, as well as articles in Tricycle, SELF, Utne Reader, Fitness, Counseling Today, Cosmopolitan and Experience Life.  Gregg presents to diverse audiences ranging from mental health professionals to Zen practitioners throughout the world.  He has been a featured speaker at national conferences on Buddhist Psychology, Mindfulness and Psychotherapy and Attention Deficit Disorder.  His other books include A Natural Approach to Mental Wellness (ToDo Institute, 2011), and A Finger Pointing to the Moon (ToDo Institute, 1996, 2007).
Through his books, distance learning courses and residential retreats Gregg has introduced thousands of people to an approach to life that emphasizes character development over symptom reduction, and continues to point people towards doing something meaningful with their life in spite of their limitations and problems.

Private Life

Gregg has worked as a volunteer in refugee camps in Thailand, where he worked with orphan children. He now has two beautiful adopted daughters from China and Vietnam.  His personal interests include hiking, piano, haiku poetry, and basketball. He currently lives in residence at the ToDo Institute in Vermont with his wife Linda, daughters Chani and Abbie, and their Golden Retriever, Barley.